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Genealogy and Assessing Risk

Fellowship for kindred spirits.
circular
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Re: Genealogy and Assessing Risk

Postby circular » Sun Jul 14, 2019 9:59 am

NF52 wrote:
circular wrote:Couldn't delete this second copy. Was trying to edit and clicked quote instead. Terrible habit of mine ... thought I was doing so much better about it :roll:
Hi circ,
If you go to your duplicate post and then the row of icons where the "quote" mark is, you'll see the second one in is an X. Click on that and it will delete your second post. (And it only works on your posts; we can't go around deleting each others!) Might not stay "open" forever; I just noticed one disappeared on mine, so no worries if it's a duplicate!!

Thanks, but that's what's weird, the X isn't appearing even though I'm logged in. I'm used to seeing it, and unfortunately having to use it a lot! :lol:
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.

mike
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Re: Genealogy and Assessing Risk

Postby mike » Mon Jul 15, 2019 2:52 pm

Morazan wrote:Well, in my arrogance, I had been assuming that I would take after Dora, my great-grandmother, who was vivacious and independent into her late 80s. Or my own mother, who is approaching 90 in good health. So imagine my shock when I received my 23andMe results (ApoE 4/4). What? I'm not Dora!? I'm Phoebe!? How can this be?! NOT FAIR!!! Suddenly, "genealogy" became painfully real and relevant. I can now "see" that cruel gene making its way directly from Phoebe, to Charles (died in his early 60s), through my grandmother (70s, no dementia), to my father (died at age 41 with heart/artery congestion), to me (noticeable memory issues since menopause), and to my sweet daughter, who is also 4/4. And when I look at my brothers, I suspect that two of them are 4/4 too, although they refuse to get tested.

Hi Mary from another 4/4. In addition to what NF52 said, it also appears that much of the AD risk is passed down from the mother, as there appears to be a mitochondrial connection, and those genes only come from your mother. You mentioned that your daughter is 4/4...was she tested? You only give one of your 4s to your daughter, the other APOE will come from her father - if he is 3/3, then your daughter would be 3/4 - much better than being 4/4.
Sonoma Mike
4/4

Morazan
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Re: Genealogy and Assessing Risk

Postby Morazan » Mon Jul 22, 2019 1:21 am

Hi, Mike, yes my daughter was tested and she is 4/4. It's been a difficult thing to negotiate -- dealing with my own "grieving process" while trying to maintain an "up" attitude for her -- "surely there will be a cure, look at all the great research!" Her father's poor health was already an indicator, so it wasn't a shock, but it definitely casts a dark shadow. She's only 24.

And hello, NF52... Thank you for your in-depth, thoughtful reply and warm welcome. I agree that there are many things to be encouraged about, and many things to be proactive about, but I also think it's important to be realistic. I feel confident that I have at least ten good years ahead of me (I'm only 55), but I'm also very much aware of how much my brain has gone downhill already, in terms of holding onto new learning, getting lost, losing things, or having trouble holding a multi-digit number in memory long enough to type it into my computer (I work as a bookkeeper, so this is not something I'm just imagining). I have, frankly, NOT been someone who has lived a healthy lifestyle, and each step in the right direction has been, and continues to be, a struggle. Therefore, rather than assume I'll live to a healthy 85, I prefer to assume I won't, and that therefore I must push myself to accomplish whatever I'm here to accomplish right now. (But, of course, in the back of my mind, I'm thinking, "If I can turn the ship around and squeeze out ten good years, then surely they'll find a cure, look at all the great research!")

As for the "primer," I found it overwhelming. I'll just focus on daily walks and eating vegetables for now, and take another look at the advanced topics after I get a grip on the basics.

Anyway, delighted to find this site. I have it bookmarked and will try to check in once a week or so. Carpe diem.

mike
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Re: Genealogy and Assessing Risk

Postby mike » Mon Jul 22, 2019 2:34 pm

Morazan wrote:I also think it's important to be realistic. I feel confident that I have at least ten good years ahead of me (I'm only 55), but I'm also very much aware of how much my brain has gone downhill already,

Mary, I'm 59, and have been improving over the last couple of years. I also had poor health habits when younger. It is possible to slow and reverse this.
Sonoma Mike
4/4


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