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APOE4, kids, going back to school

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Kvandermeer
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APOE4, kids, going back to school

Postby Kvandermeer » Tue Aug 11, 2020 1:25 am

Hello, we're Americans living in the UK and as of today, the school's plan is a full on-campus return, complete with clubs, sports and indoor swimming. We have three kids ages 7, 8, and 10. Our 10 yo is APOE4/4 and "recovered" (it's ongoing; he still struggles to mount a proper immune response and a variety of vestibular malfunctions) from vaccine damage.

If we choose to home-school, at this rate, it is not actively supported by the school. Put another way, we're on our own. If the school supported remote learning, providing curriculum, this would be a no-brainer.

I have seen the articles that suggest those with APOE4/4 are at higher risk, but our kids are in the low-risk age group. I'm asking for your opinions... There is much to be gained by being at school, esp as my 10 yo is getting into more sophisticated learning and social developments, however, the more I see about Covid 19 long term effects, the more it concerns me, and we've worked hard to get him where he is. All this not to mention, exposure and possibility of bringing it home to us, the parents.

What would you do and why? Thank you.

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Re: APOE4, kids, going back to school

Postby AKA » Tue Aug 11, 2020 9:07 am

Kvandermeer wrote:Hello, we're Americans living in the UK and as of today, the school's plan is a full on-campus return, complete with clubs, sports and indoor swimming. We have three kids ages 7, 8, and 10. Our 10 yo is APOE4/4 and "recovered" (it's ongoing; he still struggles to mount a proper immune response and a variety of vestibular malfunctions) from vaccine damage.

If we choose to home-school, at this rate, it is not actively supported by the school. Put another way, we're on our own. If the school supported remote learning, providing curriculum, this would be a no-brainer.

I have seen the articles that suggest those with APOE4/4 are at higher risk, but our kids are in the low-risk age group. I'm asking for your opinions... There is much to be gained by being at school, esp as my 10 yo is getting into more sophisticated learning and social developments, however, the more I see about Covid 19 long term effects, the more it concerns me, and we've worked hard to get him where he is. All this not to mention, exposure and possibility of bringing it home to us, the parents.

What would you do and why? Thank you.


Welcome, Kvandermeer!

Your concerns for your son and family in our current environment with all the uncertainties are certainly reasonable. It's not easy navigating these times despite all we know and the hopeful research coming up. I commend you on reaching for the best possible course of action going forward.

I am sure more seasoned members will chime in here. I don't have any solid data that would give me a confident opinion to share with you as you make your decision. Have you consulted with your son's physician regarding his immune response and returning to school? Do the doctors have your son on a program to bolster his immune system? I did a quick search and did see other Online Options for Homeschooling Overseas. Could this be an option?

As this is your first post, Kvandereer, I would like to point out a few areas on the site that may be helpful as you search the site for further information. The "How-To" Get the most out of the ApoE4.info website is a guide that gives info on how to follow topics that interest you, using the quotes when responding to posts and more. The Primer, written by member physician, Stavia, is an introduction to everything apoe4 and a great read. Also, please feel free to share more about yourself in the Our Stories forum. Finally, there is a section in the wiki page that has a list of Apoe4 aware health practitioners, you can find it here.

Again, a warm welcome!
Andrea
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Re: APOE4, kids, going back to school

Postby NF52 » Tue Aug 11, 2020 12:28 pm

Kvandermeer wrote:Hello, we're Americans living in the UK and as of today, the school's plan is a full on-campus return, complete with clubs, sports and indoor swimming. We have three kids ages 7, 8, and 10. Our 10 yo is APOE4/4 and "recovered" (it's ongoing; he still struggles to mount a proper immune response and a variety of vestibular malfunctions) from vaccine damage. ...What would you do and why? Thank you.
Welcome, Kvandermeer! The decisions you face are painfully difficult, and obviously don't end with simply deciding "go/no go", since either leads to further decisions.(Stay home how long? Do what if a child in another class tests positive?)
There are no right answers here, and you're right: the UK Biobank Study was of senior citizens and the numbers are probably not sufficient to make conclusions for young children, particularly since the data had not been updated since 2017 to include any recent diagnosis of dementia--a known risk factor for severe disease.

FWIW, my 5 year old grandson was exposed for up to two days to two difference classmates later diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19 in his preschool program in early March. No children, to my knowledge, caught it from them at preschool--a setting not known for social distance, no bodily contact or un-runny noses! I can't rule out the possibility that he or others were completely asymptomatic; if so, it doesn't seem they infected others at school or home. (Given the connections between families at this small school, word would have gotten out.)

I'm also the parent of a son who had surgery on his esophagus at birth and heart surgery at age 5, who had significant asthma and frequent bronchitis and pneumonia as a child. Like you and your spouse, my husband and I learned early on that there are no easy answers. We chose what we thought was our best (or most reasonable option) in many situations and didn't worry about what others would have done. Luckily, he is now a healthy, happy adult, and has managed to get through a week in hospital isolation in 2009 due to H1N1 influenza. It didn't help my anxiety that it was a 24 hour flight away, and he hadn't told us until he was getting better, but it taught me that he was careful (he took himself to the hospital at the first sign of breathing difficulty) and resilient. Do I still worry about him? Absolutely--and also glad that we listened to a doctor who encouraged us to never treat him as fragile.

If I were in your situation, I would look at the local positivity rate for testing and the incidence rate (how many cases per 100,000) to see if the virus is rampant. In a situation like we have had in some US cities, I would be leery; in other US cities, I would be much more ready to gingerly try it. BUT, I would also want to hear in great detail the school's plans for mask-wearing, for not having kids play contact sports in PE or on the playground, for not singing in chorus or sharing food at lunch. I'd also want to hear what the plans are for keeping kids in "pods" so that a group of 15 or so might be in the fifth grade class with one or two teachers coming in during the day. If a child in his class got sick, I would want the school (or local contact tracer) to notify me if he was within 6 feet of that child for more than 10 minutes in the 48 hours before symptoms started, or the positive test was taken.

If so, I would quarantine my son at home and try to have him and the family wear a mask and avoid hugs and kisses for 5-7 days (data suggest 90% of symptoms start within 5-7 days after exposure and that the infectious period is about 2 days before symptoms appear and about 3 days afterwards). I'd ask for a test within 2-4 days, to be able to tell early if he is positive, assuming you can get results back quickly.

But that's just me and I'm neither an epidemiologist nor an infectious disease doctor! You need to be able to sleep at night and know that he will be okay no matter what. If he's home from school, it won't be for the next 8 years; if he goes back; you can always change your mind. Don't worry about ApoE 4 in this equation--it's enormously unlikely to be a factor, IMHO.

Hugs from a 4/4 grandmother.
4/4 and still an optimist!

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Re: APOE4, kids, going back to school

Postby Sara » Tue Aug 11, 2020 6:30 pm

Greetings Kvandemeer, This is certainly a trying time for parents with school age children. Listen to your intuition and make the decision that works best for you and your family. My daughter-in-law has decided to home-school her three older children who are close in age to your children. She found and purchased a curriculum that works for them and is now actively preparing to begin. She has the skill set and determination which will allow her to succeed. For now, that is what works best for her family. They remain open to making a change in the future if it does not work out or when the environment seems safer. Good luck.
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